Making gender equality central to post-COVID-19 recovery: Debt relief and innovative finance

April 1, 2021 | Webinar 

How can debt relief help address gender inequalities as part of the COVID-19 crisis recovery? Register now to attend this free webinar hosted by PEP and IDRC on April 1 at 12:30 p.m. UTC.

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Alongside the impacts of the pandemic, the pressure of public debt is increasing for emerging economies. This heightens the challenges for an inclusive recovery, and for addressing the gender inequalities that have been amplified during the pandemic. 

Ahead of the World Bank and IMF Spring Meetings, the Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP) and the International Development Research Centre (IDRC) are bringing together a panel of experts in gender and economics for a webinar to explore emerging research into debt management and policies that can promote gender equality

Debt is a major concern for many countries and has been made worse by COVID-19. The economic recovery from the pandemic requires bold, innovative, and sustainable responses that address the simultaneous crises of debt, climate change and inequalities.

This event on Thursday, 1 April 2021, will examine recent research into previous debt relief efforts—such as the Heavily Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) Initiative—and the current debt challenges. How is the growth of debt  limiting investments necessary to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals and the Paris Agreement, and affecting policy choices as countries seek to recover from the COVID-19 crisis? How can investments to address gender inequalities be promoted as part of debt relief? What can previous debt-relief efforts teach us to help make gender equality central to current debt management and recovery policies?  

Speakers

Professor Jayati Ghosh (keynote and panelist) – Professor of Economics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA. Professor Ghosh previously taught economics at Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi for nearly 35 years. 

Professor Diane Elson (panelist) – Emeritus Professor, Sociology Department, University of Essex in the UK.

Andrew Hurst (panelist) – Director, Economic Growth and IFIs, Global Affairs Canada

Professor Jane Mariara (panelist on African research on gender in macro-economics) – Executive Director, Partnership for Economic Policy

Moderator

Erin Tansey – Director, Sustainable Inclusive Economies, IDRC.

 

Register to attend

April 1, 2021 

8:30 a.m. EDT | 12:30 p.m. UTC
1:30 p.m. BST | 3:30 p.m. EAT  
(75 minutes)
Find your local time

Simultaneous interpretation (English-French) will be available for this event.

Webinars are online workshops that you can attend via the internet from your computer or portable internet device.

This webinar will use the Zoom video conferencing platform. If you have not attended a Zoom webinar before, please read this guide to joining and participating as an attendee.

The event will be recorded to be distributed publicly afterwards. By registering for this event, you give your consent for this.

The information you provide will be held on our database to process your booking. We do not share data with any third parties.

About PEP and IDRC 

The Partnership for Economic Policy (PEP) considers women's economic empowerment vital for sustainable, equitable development. Through our current research initiatives, we are supporting gender-sensitive policymaking as a step towards gender equality. 

IDRC is a Canadian Crown corporation that funds research in developing countries to create lasting change on a large scale. IDRC supports local organizations in the Global South to generate the evidence that is relevant in their context. They provide financial resources, advice, and training to researchers in developing countries to help them find solutions to local problems, and encourage knowledge sharing with policy-makers, researchers, and communities.

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