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As part of the PEP-UNDP Poverty and Social Impact Analysis (PSIA) initiative, this project sought to assess the effectiveness and progressivity of Uganda’s Universal Primary Education (UPE) program since it was first introduced in 1997, by examining factors driving primary school attendance, grade delay and drop out trends for children between the ages of 6 and 12 over the past two decades. The researchers' findings reveal that primary school attendance has been progressive over time and, in recent years, pro-poor, in the sense that the poorest people have been its major beneficiaries. However, both demand and supply-side factors affecting the provision and use of primary education still stand in the way of achieving optimal and equitable participation from UPE. The analysis also suggests that policies targeting the poor as well as the poorer parts of the country could yield considerable additional benefits, in terms of greater progressiveness and pro-poorness of the UPE policy. Find out more through the following PEP working paper:

Country: 
Uganda
Project code: 
PMMA-12290
Image: 

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