Debating issues related to privatization, labour and foreign investments in Vietnam

Hanoi, Vietnam - December 25, 2012

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On December 25, 2012, a group of local researchers in Vietnam presented their PEP-supported research findings during a special policy seminar, sponsored by PEP and hosted by the Center for Analysis and Forecasting, of the Vietnam Academy of Social Sciences (VASS), in Hanoi.

Find out more about this particular project's policy findings and recommendations through:

PEP policy brief 100 : "Privatization and Poverty Reduction in Vietnam: Optimal Choices and Potential Impacts".

PEP working paper 2012-02 (the complete research report - same title)

Apart from scholars and academics from various research institutes and universities in the country, the event gathered policy makers and stakeholders from the National Institute for Vocational Training (NIVT), the Institute of Labour Science and Social Affairs (ILSSA), the National Council for Science and Technology Policy (NCST), as well as representatives from the Ministry of Planning and the Ministry of Industry and Trade.
Based on the long discussion/debate period that followed the researchers' presentation of their findings and conclusions, it was made clear that some of the ensuing policy recommendations had raised particularly great interest amongst the policy-related attendants. Three of these recommendations, in particular, were actively debated:

  • Need to conduct further reform of "state-owned enterprises" (SOEs) and to reduce the size of "center-state-owned" firms
  • Need to encourage the development of a high-skilled labor force of industrial workers, and related vocational policies (from the 1956 government program)
  • Need to change perspective and policies regarding foreign-owned firms and promotion of foreign direct investments (FDI)

According to the attendants' comments, it is expected that these recommendations will serve as input in the preparation of documents to be discussed in upcoming National Assembly meetings.

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